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RedIT Agrees to Become Part of KIO Networks’ Network

The Spanish word for network is “red.” RedIT, a binational business with San Diego as its U.S. headquarters, said recently that it agreed to be acquired by Mexico-based KIO Networks.

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed, and regulators still need to approve the acquisition.

RedIT offers Internet connectivity, cloud computing services and data center services on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. Murray Case is its CEO.

According to a statement issued by redIT on June 17, KIO Networks plans to add redIT’s metropolitan fiber optic networks and six technology campuses to its infrastructure, expanding to a total of 12 technology campuses with 28 data centers. The redIT workforce, which exceeds 500 employees, will be integrated with KIO Networks, resulting in a total workforce of more than 2,000 people.

In addition to Mexico, KIO is in Panama, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic. It plans to add service in Spain.

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What’s In a Name? Early this month, the Fierce Wireless blog interviewed Jennifer Van Buskirk, president of Cricket Wireless, the San Diego company that is now a part of AT&T (NYSE: T). The Q&A brought out a couple of interesting thoughts about taking a product to market — whether high-tech, low-tech or no tech. The writer asked about Cricket being associated with “cheap service with cheap phones and a not-so-great network.” In response, Van Buskirk said people like the price and that AT&T is improving the network. That explains why you see the company billing itself as the New Cricket. Van Buskirk declined to say how much AT&T was spending to advertise Cricket and its new capabilities. Another point: AT&T decided to hang on to the Cricket name because the public already associates the word with wireless. “It’s easier than starting from scratch,” Van Buskirk said. Besides, perceptions about the brand can be changed. One of AT&T’s other choices was to go with its Aio brand for no-annual-contract wireless, but that brand was only in 28 markets. See the interview at http://bit.ly/1lCMyPC.

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A Trunk Full of Data: Teradata’s Rancho Bernardo workforce writes software and develops hardware to help big organizations make sense of mountains of data. The corporation is out with new offerings around Apache Hadoop software: they include software, a hardware appliance, consulting services and customer service. Hadoop is an open-source framework for storing and processing large amounts of data on — this is significant — commodity hardware. That’s according to Silicon Valley software writer HortonWorks Inc. One of Hadoop’s good features is that it is scalable. The Teradata appliance can scale from 144 terabytes to more than 98 petabytes of data; a petabyte is one byte multiplied by 1 with 15 zeroes behind it. Teradata (NYSE: TDC) is based in Dayton, Ohio.

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In Brief: Carlsbad-based ViaSat Inc. (Nasdaq: VSAT) said recently that it successfully demonstrated midflight switching between a Department of Defense satellite and a commercial satellite, both operating on the Ka band, as part of a U.S. Air Force test.

Send San Diego technology news to bradg@sdbj.com.

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