— Deckard Technologies Inc., headed by local serial entrepreneur Neil Senturia, recently raised just shy of $370,000 of a $500,000 offering.

It’s unclear what product or service the company is developing or commercializing — Senturia didn’t respond to a request for comment — but according to LinkedIn, the company recently hired at least three former Qualcomm engineers. Qualcomm, of course, has laid off about 1,500 people in recent months, most locally, but it is not clear whether these Deckard employees were among them, or simply jonesing for a taste of the startup life.

Senturia is listed as CEO on a document filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and the address for the company is the same as Senturia’s early-stage VC fund, Blackbird Ventures.

PH Ignite Offers Resources to Startups

A law firm with a presence in San Diego has launched an effort to raise its profile in the startup community.

Paul Hastings, which has about 30 attorneys at its San Diego office, recently debuted PH Ignite, a website with resources for startups such as documents and information on company formation and growth.

Scott Oross, a locally based lawyer in the corporate practice of Paul Hastings who joined the firm’s San Diego office 17 years ago, is among the firm’s partners who led the PH Ignite effort.

The site is similar to those other law firms have debuted historically, such as Cooley Go, launched by Cooley LLC in 2014.

Oross said he is seeing levels of startup activity locally that match those he witnessed in the dot-com boom — and that the firm wants to highlight its expertise in the area as it continues to grow.

“We want people to know we’re here,” he said. “This is work with emerging companies that a number of us at Paul Hastings have done for decades.”

Past’s Healing Presence

A local company developing therapies to improve quality of life for the elderly recently announced the launch of a digital therapeutic device intended for those with Alzheimer’s disease, other dementias and social isolation.

The product, by Dthera Sciences, is called ReminX. It is a scalable delivery method for Reminiscence Therapy, a common behavioral intervention used to treat these conditions.

The product, delivered via a computer tablet designed for seniors, uses an AI chatbot and proprietary emotional recognition software.

Edward Cox, CEO of Dthera Sciences, said the product would allow Reminiscence Therapy to be delivered to thousands for “a little over” $1 daily.

The company said a clinical pilot study conducted through UC San Diego showed ReminX reduced anxiety, depression and emotional distress in patients with dementia.

“There is currently a great void in treating mood symptoms often seen in patients with dementia,” said Vincent Filoteo, a UCSD professor of psychiatry and lead investigator in the study. “Reminiscence Therapy is a well-validated treatment for these symptoms in both dementia and social isolation. A tool that can digitally deliver Reminiscence Therapy in a consistent and highly accessible manner has the potential to have an even greater impact on mood symptoms, and would most likely also improve cognition and quality of life.”