San Diego Business Journal

— The San Diego County Bar Foundation (SDCBF) inducted the 2016 class for the Distinguished Lawyer Memorial, which recognizes local lawyers and judges who have passed away who possessed superior legal skills and high ethical standards.

Each inductee was recognized with a permanent plaque in the Hall of Justice at the San Diego County Courthouse.

The 2016 Distinguished Lawyer Memorial inductees are:

Paul D. Engstrand (1919 – 2015): Engstrand practiced law in San Diego for nearly 60 years and is best known for his water rights litigation. Throughout his career, Engstrand tried numerous such cases including 34 that reached the appellate courts. The most significant include Escondido Mutual Water Co. v. La Jolla, Rincon, San Pasqual, Pauma and Pala bands of Mission Indians, which Engstrand argued (and won) before the U.S. Supreme Court in 1984.

Judge Gilbert Harelson (1919 – 2015): For more than 50 years, Harelson served the legal community and San Diego with dedication, diligence and integrity. His even courtroom demeanor, decisiveness and sense of fair play, along with his wit and humor, made him one of the most respected and liked members of the judiciary.

George McClenahan (1923 – 2015): After establishing a reputation as a vigorous and honorable prosecutor as deputy district attorney in Madera, McClenahan moved to San Diego in 1952 to work in the San Diego County District Attorney’s office. One of his most public cases was the defense of the late Mayor Frank Curran against charges of bribery and conspiracy. He is fondly remembered for his unfailing adherence to bar ethics and his constant ability to keep a light touch and superb sense of humor.

Judge Gordon Thompson Jr. (1929 – 2015): Thompson was a federal judge on the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California. He served on the federal bench from 1970-2015. He acted as the district’s chief judge from 1984-1991, taking senior status in 1994 and served in that capacity until his death in 2015. His strength of character, unwavering commitment to fundamental fairness and unconditional resolution to treat everyone equally was recognized by all he encountered.

Judge Douglas R. Woodworth (1928 – 2015): In 1953, Woodworth and his young family moved to San Diego, where he built his civil law practice. He was a partner in the firm Stickney, Ortlieb, Woodworth and Moats before starting a solo practice. In 1968, he was appointed by Gov. Ronald Reagan to the Municipal Court. He was elevated to the Superior Court in 1972. Woodworth formally retired from the bench in 1988, though he continued to work as a “substitute judge” for many years.

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The San Diego Law Library is celebrating the seventh year of its popular Lindley Lecture on Law & Comics. This year’s panel is titled “Rise of the Independents.”

It will be held from 4-5 p.m. on July 19 at San Diego Central Library’s Neil Morgan Auditorium, 330 Park Blvd. Guest panelists are Terry Moore and Stu Rees, and our host and moderator is George Brewster.

The panel will address whether independent comics artists can make it at Comic-Con when Hollywood’s impact and importance continues to grow. Tickets are free, but seating is limited, so register early.

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EIP LLP announced recently that Mallary de Merlier and Nick Transier have been named co-managing partners of the firm’s U.S. office in San Diego.

EIP LLP is a United Kingdom-based intellectual property law firm that opened offices in San Diego three years ago. The firm provides a range of services, including patent, trademark and design registration; IP searches and opinions; and European IP litigation. The San Diego office was the firm’s fifth office and the first outside of the United Kingdom.

De Merlier is a registered U.S. Patent Attorney with more than 15 years of experience in IP for the biotechnology and medical device industries. She has represented clients in a variety of fields including immunology, molecular biology, pharmaceuticals, diagnostics, and medical.

Transier is a registered U.S. Patent Attorney with extensive experience drafting and prosecuting patents related to consumer electronic devices, computer software systems, distributed power generation, display technologies, telecommunications, and mechanical devices.

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Higgs Fletcher & Mack has hired three new associates, Daniel Todd, Amanda McCarty and Justine Wong.

Todd will focus on immigration, McCarty will assist Virginia Price and the transportation and litigation practice group, and Wong will work with Charles Reidelbach on intellectual property and Jim Eischen for transactional support.

Prior to joining Higgs, Todd was a senior associate attorney for more than 13 years at Hurwitz Holt, A P.L.C., where he represented companies, organizations and individuals specializing in diverse areas of technology, scientific research, engineering, manufacturing, publishing, commerce and entertainment in employment-based immigration cases.

McCarty joins the firm after serving as associate attorney at Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP. In this role, she provided assistance in the defense of a wide array of litigation matters including commercial breach of contract, insurance bad faith, national consumer class action and high-exposure personal injury defense for major insurers.

A licensed patent attorney, Wong comes to the firm from Innovative IP Solutions PC where she managed the intellectual property portfolios for venture capitalist companies and corporations. Prior to that, she was the Judicial Extern to the Honorable Nita L. Stormes.

Randy Frisch is vice chancellor of business administration at National University and a former publisher of the San Diego Business Journal. He is licensed to practice law in California, Nevada and Idaho. He can be reached at rcfrisch@msn.com.