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Skyriver Expands Local Network With NetHere Acquisition

Skyriver Communications Inc. said April 21 that it completed the acquisition of NetHere Inc., a local Internet service provider, for an undisclosed sum. Through the acquisition, Skyriver added a large number of business customers and expanded its network to include a substantial portion of southern San Diego County.

“This acquisition represents a key component of Skyriver’s growth strategy,” said Saeed Khorami, chief executive officer of Skyriver. “We will continue to aggressively expand our fixed wireless infrastructure throughout California and beyond through a combination of organic deployments and additional acquisitions.”

Andy Taubman, chairman of NetHere, said his company has been a reseller of Skyriver’s fixed wireless services for several years.

“We know that they operate a high quality network,” he said “We (also) believe that they are honest, have integrity and care about good service.”

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SGIS Noticed For Sales Growth: Defense contractor SGIS said April 23 that it was named to Entrepreneur Magazine’s Hot 100 list of the Fastest Growing Businesses in America for 2008. The San Diego-based company was ranked 10th for sales and job growth.

“We are incredibly honored to be recognized by Entrepreneur Magazine as one of the fastest-growing companies in America,” said Chief Executive Officer Hany Girgis.

Girgis said SGIS is becoming a leader in government contracting, and has 850 employees in 14 offices nationwide.

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Recycling Honors: Kyocera Wireless Corp. said April 28 it earned its eighth consecutive recycling award from the city of San Diego’s Environmental Services Department. The honor is Kyocera’s 15th award from the city , the most of any business, according to city officials.

“Seeking harmonious balance between economic development and environmental preservation has been a core tenet at Kyocera since its inception in 1959,” said Rod Lanthone, president of Kyocera Wireless.

Kyocera said it recycled 75 percent of its waste in 2007, contributing $40,000 in recycling revenues and $400,000 in costs for utilities and other materials.

Last year, Kyocera recycled more than 430,000 pounds of paper, plastic, electronic and other waste. The company also conserved more than 3.3 million kilowatt hours of electricity, enough energy to power 705 average local homes for a year.

Send technology news to Michelle Mowad at mmowad@sdbj.com.

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