65.4 F
San Diego
Saturday, Oct 1, 2022
-Advertisement-

Letters



Editor:

Connie Lewis’ Nov. 19 column “Jack’s Secret Weapon Ad Too Saucy for Some Television Viewers” was a pleasure to read.

Marketing ideas and reactions to them seem like a good litmus test for how tolerant our society is at any given moment.

Do you think current economic conditions impact our collective mood and thus our willingness to embrace such things (a la women’s hem lines)?

While the hot tub scene is a cheeky sketch that induces knowing grins and maybe a raised eyebrow, I was not offended.

- Advertisement -

I prefer the take that Jack, oblivious to the implications, is steadfastly focused on his business food.

I am forever curious as to why some messages provoke such a strong response (in this case “sexual connotations” are offensive) and how others (like the current running series that follow conspiring housewives on their quest to kill the Burger “King”) is acceptable.

Although not offensive to me, I wonder if viewers of the Jack commercial hold equal contempt for Burger King’s creative license.

Have we acquired a palette for hired hit men, explicit violence and attempted murder, but a distaste for nuances, veiled sexuality and suggestive overtones?

The real offense would be if such distinctions really exist.

Thanks again for the article.


Bret Alan Hulitt, AIA

San Diego

– – –


Inherently Tasteless And Offensive


Editor:

I hadn’t complained, but I found the Jack in the Box hot tub ad offensive enough to remember it and describe it disparagingly to friends and family. Like so many things, I suppose, we just get used to advertising that is inherently tasteless and was once forbidden.

Carl’s Junior got away with their “flat buns” ad, for a while, and now Jack in the Box has jumped into the pool. I don’t want my kids to see this ad, but it’s too late.

I wouldn’t want my mom to see this ad. It’s like anything else , if it’s something you wouldn’t want to have to explain, don’t get caught doing it.

If the good folks at Jack in the Box wouldn’t explain just exactly what is implied to their kids and their grandkids, then they ought to save it for a cocktail party.

For Jack in the Box, and Carl’s, I’ve lost my appetite.


Tom Parham

Leucadia

– – –


Did Not Find It Offensive at All


Editor:

As a parent of two small children, I did not find the ad offensive at all. My kids, ages 3 and 5, have no idea what a Jack sandwich is other than it’s made by some guy named Jack.

Also, as a potential consumer in my mid-30s with a husband in his mid-40s, the ad hit just right.

I found it a little off, but kind of funny and my husband laughed out loud.

Jack in the Box’s target consumer is not a woman, as evidenced by the failure of the JBX launch. Its core loyal following is primarily men in their 20s to 40s and this ad was perfectly executed.

It focused on the older male, spoke to their days of youth and was edgy enough to be remembered.


Angela Hill

incitrio Design{Brand}Media

San Diego

-Advertisement-

Featured Articles

-Advertisement-
-Advertisement-

Related Articles

-Advertisement-
-Advertisement-
-Advertisement-