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Monday, Jul 22, 2024
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Labor—Web site sets up worker-employer matches

New San Diego-based recruiting venture ConstructionJobs.com is helping connect members of the construction world to top-name companies seeking candidates for mid- to executive-level jobs.

The site’s targeted search capabilities give users , both employers and job seekers , an ability to effectively post, search and find their perfect fit.

Those seeking employment can fill out a form, including their basic information, work experience and references, for free. Then companies from across the nation, by paying a flat fee, gain unlimited use of the site’s database and can search for a candidate that fits their profile. Sema Construction Co. of Denver and Wharton Smith, Inc. of Orlando have already signed up as beta testers for the site.

ConstructionJobs.com includes 80 construction-specific industries and 68 specific job titles, which nearly eliminates construction candidates’ need to post resumes at multiple nonspecific job-search Web sites.

The company’s founder and CEO, Gary Petersen, is a 25-year veteran of the industry. He designed ConstructionJobs.com, which was launched last week.

“Having been a job-seeker, employer and recruiter in this industry, I have an intimate understanding of the needs of each , and the weaknesses of the recruitment and job seeking support options currently available,” Petersen said.

“I set out to design the ideal recruiting environment, one that would eliminate the frustration and wasted time experienced as a result of the mismatched applicants and employers often produced by current recruiting resources.”

The site will prove useful in coming years. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the construction industry accounted for 6 million wage and salary jobs and 1.6 million self-employed jobs in 1998. The industry is expected to grow about 9 percent through 2008.

Construction employers are faced with the problem of a lack of a qualified work force, resulting in an expanding market need for middle- and upper-management job positions, Petersen said.

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