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Monday, Jul 15, 2024
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Hospice Honored for Its Service to Veterans and Their Families

The Elizabeth Hospice announced that it received the Disabled American Veterans Outstanding Midsize Employer of the Year during the 96th DAV National Convention in New Orleans.

The Elizabeth Hospice strives to bring comfort to patients with a history of military service by matching hospice patients with fellow veteran staff or volunteers. The organization currently has 15 veterans on staff and is actively recruiting more through DAV Veterans Career Fairs. Eight percent of the company’s volunteers are also veterans.

Jan Jones, CEO and president of The Elizabeth Hospice, said the nonprofit considers it a privilege to spend time with veterans and their families and “thank them for their service to our country.”

DAV National Commander Dave Riley said he is grateful to the hospice for “making a singular effort to hire veterans who are able to provide comfort and care for fellow veterans entering the final stages of life.”

DAV is a nonprofit founded in 1920 with nearly 1.3 million members. It is dedicated to a single purpose: fulfilling promises to the men and women who served by ensuring that veterans and their families can access the full range of benefits available to them; lobbying for injured veterans on Capitol Hill; providing employment resources to veterans and their spouses and educating the public about the sacrifices and needs of veterans transitioning back to civilian life.

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Feeding San Diego announced a $52,000 grant from the Walmart Foundation to help fight hunger in San Diego through Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, education and outreach. SNAP (formerly known as food stamps) is the largest federal assistance program working to fight hunger in America. More than 70 percent of SNAP benefits go to households with children. Yet, 17 percent of Americans eligible for SNAP currently do not receive this benefit. Only 41 percent of eligible seniors are enrolled.

With this grant, Feeding San Diego will work to increase access to SNAP (known as CalFresh in California) among eligible households, with particular emphasis on reaching seniors, families with children, and other vulnerable populations.

Vince Hall, CEO of Feeding San Diego, said, “…We can’t end hunger alone. Programs like SNAP help to fill a critical gap for people in need.”

In San Diego, the Walmart Foundation has provided a number of infrastructure grants, most recently in 2016. Additionally, in 2016, Walmart Stores Inc. donated more than 22 million pounds of food, the equivalent of more than 18 million meals, to fight hunger in San Diego. Visit feedingsandiego.org.

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The Boys & Girls Club of San Marcos honored Steve and Laura Wagner and Escondido-based Stone Brewing Co. in recognition of passing the $1 million milestone in financial contributions to the organization.

As president and co-founder, Wagner has led the brewery in contributing millions of dollars to local nonprofits, investing in the community where they live and work. As advocates for children in the community, the Wagners have personally invested in the organization through substantial gifts to the club’s annual giving campaign and through time as volunteers.

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Reuben Shaw, a professor of molecular and cell biology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, has received the National Cancer Institute Outstanding Investigator Award, which encourages cancer research with breakthrough potential. Shaw, a holder of the William R. Brody Chair, will receive $4.2 million in direct funding over the next seven years to further his work. The award is granted, according to the NCI website, to innovative cancer researchers with outstanding records of productivity to allow them to take greater risks and be more adventurous in their research.

Shaw’s research focuses on cancer metabolism: how metabolic pathways are altered in cancer and play a role in the origins and progression of the disease. While investigating one of the most commonly mutated genes in lung cancer, Shaw discovered an energy-sensing pathway that shuts down cell growth and reprograms metabolism when nutrients are scarce. This energy-sensing “starvation” pathway suggests an unexpected and direct link between metabolic pathways and cancer.

Shaw is the second Salk scientist in the award’s three-year history to be named an NCI Outstanding Investigator. The other is Geoffrey Wahl, a professor in the Gene Expression Laboratory.

Send Kudos/Giving items to sglidden@sdbj.com

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