Samsung’s new Galaxy S9 smartphone includes Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chip in certain markets. Photo courtesy of Samsung

Samsung’s new Galaxy S9 smartphone includes Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 chip in certain markets. Photo courtesy of Samsung

— Samsung’s newly unveiled smartphone, the Galaxy S9, contains Qualcomm Inc.’s newest premium processor, the Snapdragon 845 mobile platform, in select regions of the world. Qualcomm (Nasdaq: QCOM) made the announcement at the Mobile World Congress event on Feb. 25 in Barcelona, Spain.

Samsung’s new mobile device includes a powerful camera able to capture cinema-grade video. It also has a slow motion video function. Qualcomm said that the camera and visual processing architectures operate using up to 30 percent less power than its peers. What’s more, the device downloads wireless data at a “lightning fast” 1.2 gigabits per second, using a souped-up fourth generation wireless technology called LTE (short for Long Term Evolution). A residential cable provider advertises 1 gigabit per second as fast enough for a customer to download 10 high-definition movies in seven minutes.

The Galaxy S9 will easily support virtual reality and artificial intelligence, Qualcomm said.

Qualcomm was not the only San Diego County company that made its way to Spain. Carlsbad-based chipmaker MaxLinear showed up at Mobile World Congress, where it announced a new microwave modem that is able to send data at 5 gigabits per second. It is able to serve fifth-generation (or 5G) wireless networks.

MaxLinear (NYSE: MXL) also said a client, Denver-based Technetix Inc., displayed a product with a MaxLinear chip letting it send data at 10 gigabits per second over coaxial cable.

Separately, Carmel Valley-based chipmaker Anokiwave said its products were powering more than 10 5G wireless arrays operated by customers at the Barcelona show. Its chips operate in the three major millimeter-wave bands — the high end of the airwaves allocated to the new, 5G networks. On Feb. 20, Anokiwave announced the initial product of a “second generation” 5G microchip for base stations.

Inseego Corp., the former Novatel Wireless, also showed off its products for the mobile market and the internet of things at the Barcelona show. Inseego (Nasdaq: INSG) said its new customers include Telus and Videotron in Canada, General Communications Inc. in Alaska and a large, unnamed Japanese service provider.