The interior of Liberty Public Market. Located in Liberty Station, this 25,000 square-foot food hall features vendors selling prepared foods, craft beverages, produce, pastries, and more.

The interior of Liberty Public Market. Located in Liberty Station, this 25,000 square-foot food hall features vendors selling prepared foods, craft beverages, produce, pastries, and more. Photo by Stephen Whalen.


Don’t Confuse Food Halls With Food Courts

• Food courts are built for convenience while food halls are designed as gathering spaces.

• Gourmet, locally sourced foods are available in food halls. Food courts typically have fast-food options.

• Chain restaurants dominate food courts. Food halls have mom and pop shops.

• Food halls must be located in buildings with character. Food courts can be in a mall.

• Food hall vendors must have passion behind their products while food courts are, again, purely for convenience.

— as new trends come up and as the dining industry changes...

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