Cox Communications, one of the region’s dominant cable providers, came out against the Federal Communications Commission’s Feb. 26 decision to regulate the Internet, saying the move was “sure to be challenged in court” and calling for congressional action.

Commissioners voted 3-2 to regulate the Internet like a utility. The FCC said the move would preserve the Internet as a platform for innovation, free expression and economic growth.

President Obama recently called for such a move, saying that otherwise Internet providers would play favorites with certain traffic.

New Media Rights, a San Diego organization led by attorney Art Neill, hailed the FCC’s move, saying the three commissioners who voted for the measure were voting for strong net neutrality rules.

“Cox is disappointed in today’s FCC’s decision to reclassify broadband as a Title II utility-style service using 80-year-old telephone regulations,” said a statement from Dave Bialis, senior vice president and region manager for California. “Enacting Title II is an unnecessary government overreach that goes beyond Net Neutrality protections and is a risk to the Internet, which has been an ever increasing robust engine of commerce, communications and learning since its creation.”

Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Vista, said in a statement that the decision fixes something that was not broken. He said the House Judiciary Committee plans a hearing on the matter March 17.

“Competition in private industry drives prices down,” Issa’s statement said. “Government regulation ensures a lack of innovation.”